Dogwood District Fall Meeting Devotion by Guest Blogger P.K. Henry

Dogwood District Fall Meeting Devotion by Guest Blogger P.K. Henry

First Thessalonians 5:16-18 “Rejoice always, pray continually, give thanks in all circumstances; for this is God’s will for you”

Offering a morning prayer of thanks is an incredible way to start the day. God, the giver of life, allows each of us to wake up to new beauties each day, so it’s important that we turn to Him and offer up our gratitude.

Thanking the Lord in the morning is also a method of keeping our perspective fixed on what truly matters. Gratitude is a powerful reminder of all we have — and of the eternal love God gives us.

In these times of uncertainty and contentiousness, let’s begin each day with appreciation for what we have. Be thankful for our families and friends, be thankful for the change of seasons, be thankful for the cooling rain, be thankful for our beautiful gardens, be thankful for this – OUR GARDEN WE CALL GEORGIA.

Let us pray:

Lord, help us to focus today on what really matters. We are so grateful for another day. Please help us to keep that spirit of gratitude as we face the ebbs and flows of life; help us to see the good in the bad and the happy in the sad. Renew our spirit as we strive to preserve, protect, and nurture this garden of Georgia where we attempt to inspire others to conserve and to grow beauty. In your name we pray, Amen.

So, which tent do you live in? Contentment or Discontentment?

Choose Contentment.

 

Cover Up/Wear Boots & Gloves for Protection

Cover Up/Wear Boots & Gloves for Protection

Gardening: An Ounce of Prevention
Most people consider gardening a low-risk endeavor. However, a little research shows that it can be downright dangerous. Physical ailments from a day’s work in the yard can range from simple sore muscles and sunburn to serious injury or illness. Two simple tips could save you a trip to the emergency room.
Folks in North Fulton love to get outside and plant beautiful displays of annuals and perennials in pots and beds during May. Vegetable gardening has spurred the growth and popularity of individual and community gardens. However, very few of these frantic agriculturalists have given a single thought to the possibility of contracting tetanus also known as “lockjaw.” Most people know enough to check in with the doctor if they step on a nail, but the tetanus bacteria can be found in all planting mediums: soil, compost, manure, and potting mixes. Anyone with a scratch or puncture wound is vulnerable. Everyday yardwork injuries–cuts and scrapes–account for almost 40% of the cases of tetanus in the U.S. The best way to avoid tetanus and all its entailments is to check with your doctor. If you have not had a preventative shot within the last 10 years, don’t delay; make an appointment to get vaccinated TODAY.
In the rush to transform the yard and clear beds to plant, gardeners sometimes fail to recognize taxicodendron radicans or poison ivy. For identification purposes, the garden adage “Leaflets three; let it be” applies to poison oak as well as to poison ivy. Doctors treat countless cases of dermatitis caused by poisonous plants each year. Mild irritation and itching can be treated with a baking soda paste, an oatmeal bath, or over-the-counter products. Remember, the fluid released from blisters does not spread the rash, only coming in contact with urushiol or sap from the plant causes the condition. In order to avoid the aftereffects of a brush with poison plants, wear gloves, a long-sleeved shirt, closed shoes, and long pants to do spring gardening; AND wash yourself, your clothing, and even your dog after rummaging around in an untamed territory of the yard.
Keep your gardening experience happy and healthy this season. Project yourself against tetanus, and always wear gloves and dress sensibly to protect your skin from insect bites, sun burn, and plant-based poisons. When it comes to gardening and many other areas of life, it’s true: “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.”

It’s Almost Time to Plant Daffodils and Other Bulbs

It’s Almost Time to Plant Daffodils and Other Bulbs

Daffodil/ Narcissus General Information
Daffodils are especially long lived and they multiply. Daffodil /Narcissus is the most widespread genus.
Gardeners have plenty of colors, shapes and sizes to choose from. Yellow trumpets are just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to daffodils. There are white daffodils with pink cups, yellow daffodils with orange cups, miniature daffodils, double daffodils, split corona daffodils and many more. You can’t go wrong with these cheerful flowers.
Quotation from Homer sometime between 12th and 8th century B.C OMG 
“The Narcissus wondrously glittering, a noble sight for all, whether immortal gods or mortal men; from whose root a hundred heads spring forth, and at the fragrant odor therof all the broad heaven above and all the earth laughed, and the salt wave of the sea.” Homer: Hymn to Demeter
Fascinating History
Centuries before Homer, flowers of this species were used by the Egyptians in funeral wreaths and have been found in tombs well-preserved after 3000 years. According to legend, this flower, originally white, was turned yellow by the touch of Pluto when he captured Persephone sleeping with a wreath of them on her hair. According to Pliny the plant was named Narcissus because of the scent: Narce=narcotic. The myth of Narcissus came later. Early on, the yellow species was called “Affodyl” and “Daffadowndyllyes.”
The first daffodil show was held in Birmingham, England in 1893. Since then, the daffodil has become one of the world’s most popular flowers. It is the national flower of Wales and the birth flower for those born in the month of March. The Georgia Daffodil Society holds its annual show at the Chattahoochee Nature each March.
Easy Planting
Dig a hole at least 6” deep. Place two bulbs pointy side up in the bottom of the hole. Add a tablespoon of bone meal for good measure. Replace the dirt and then water.
*If you are confused about the right planting depth for flower bulbs, trust the bulbs. Researchers have discovered that some flower bulbs, like daffodils, adjust themselves to the right planting depth. “Contractile roots” are responsible for bulbs’ movement. Daffs are even phototropic. They “right” themselves and grow towards the sun even if you plant them upside down or sideways.
Easy Care
In the spring, enjoy the blooms and let the foliage fade and disappear naturally. Do not cut the tops or fold them. The tops feed the bulb so it can bloom the next spring.
They will multiply, so divide as needed and share w/friends.

RGC Daffodils

Spring Daffodils

Welcome

Welcome

Gibbs Gardens Image

Inspirational Statue at Gibbs Gardens.

Welcome to the RGC blog.  Our blog is a way for us to educate, inspire, inform, and even brag a little.  We hope our posts are helpful and enjoyable.  We will use this space to spotlight current environmental issues, give seasonal gardening tips, and spotlight our gardens and activities.  This is one more way to share the joys of gardening with our members and friends.